July 23, 2024

Unlock the hidden potential of your Unix operating system as we uncover the art of resuming stopped jobs.

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Discussions on Shell Programming and Scripting

Shell Programming and Scripting: Resuming Stopped Unix Jobs

To resume a stopped Unix job, follow these steps:

1. Use the jobs -p command to list all stopped jobs and their process IDs.
2. Identify the job number of the desired job from the list.
3. Bring the job to the foreground using the fg %job_number command. This will make it active in the current shell session.
4. Alternatively, you can run the job in the background by using the bg %job_number command.
5. If you want to permanently detach a job from the shell session, use the disown %job_number command.
6. You can also send a specific signal to a job using the kill %job_number command.
7. Remember, you can use the jobs command to see the status of all jobs in the current session.

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UNIX Operating Systems (HP-UX, Linux, Solaris, AIX)

  • UNIX Operating Systems: HP-UX, Linux, Solaris, AIX

Resources for Advanced & Expert Users

To resume stopped Unix jobs, follow these steps:

1. Find the job number by running the command jobs -p. This will display a list of stopped processes along with their job numbers.

2. Use the command fg %job_number to bring the desired job to the foreground. For example, fg %1 will bring the job with job number 1 to the foreground.

3. If you want to run the job in the background instead, use the command bg %job_number. This will allow the job to continue running while you work on other tasks.

4. Alternatively, you can send a specific signal to a job using the kill %job_number command. This can be useful if you need to stop or terminate a job.

Remember, job control commands like jobs -p, fg %job_number, bg %job_number, and kill %job_number are essential for managing your Unix jobs efficiently.

For more details and examples, refer to the Unix documentation or consult online forums and communities for answers to specific questions.

Helpful Tips for UNIX Beginners

  • Understanding the Basics: Familiarize yourself with the fundamental concepts and commands of UNIX to build a strong foundation.
  • Monitoring Jobs: Learn to use the ps command to monitor and manage running jobs effectively.
    Understanding the Basics: Familiarize yourself with the fundamental concepts and commands of UNIX to build a strong foundation.
Monitoring Jobs: Learn to use the <em>ps</em> command to monitor and manage running jobs effectively.
  • Stopping Jobs: Discover the Ctrl + Z shortcut to pause or stop a running job and regain control of your terminal.
  • Listing Stopped Jobs: Use the jobs command to display a list of all the stopped or backgrounded jobs.
  • Bringing Jobs to the Foreground: Understand how to bring a stopped job back to the foreground using the fg command.
  • Resuming Jobs: Learn how to resume stopped jobs in the foreground or background using the % symbol and the bg command.
    Bringing Jobs to the Foreground: Understand how to bring a stopped job back to the foreground using the <em>fg</em> command.
Resuming Jobs: Learn how to resume stopped jobs in the foreground or background using the <em>%</em> symbol and the <em>bg</em> command.
  • Background Jobs: Discover how to execute jobs in the background and manage them efficiently.
  • Killing Jobs: Master the kill command to terminate unwanted or unresponsive jobs gracefully.
  • Scheduling Jobs: Explore the at and cron commands to schedule recurring or one-time tasks.
  • Managing Output: Learn to redirect output and error messages to files using > and 2> operators.
    Scheduling Jobs: Explore the <em>at</em> and <em>cron</em> commands to schedule recurring or one-time tasks.
Managing Output: Learn to redirect output and error messages to files using <em>></em> and <em>2></em> operators.
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